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NEW YORK — Calling it an opportunity to show New York City’s “resiliency” and “invincibility,” Mayor Eric Adams began wining and dining the Democratic National Committee on Thursday, as he vies to host the party’s next presidential nominating convention in 2024.

“This is an important moment for us as we decide the future of the party,” Adams, who has dubbed himself the party’s new “face,” said during a news conference at the Jacob Javits Center in Manhattan. “We are not just nominating a Democratic presidential ticket, we are setting a brand new course for this nation.”

Adams and Gov. Kathy Hochul are hoping the DNC will overlook subway crime, persistent shootings and New York’s status as a deep blue state in selecting the host city. Conventions are often located in battleground states, like North Carolina in 2012 and Wisconsin eight years later. Former Mayor Bill de Blasio lost his own bid to host the 2016 convention to Pennsylvania.

DNC Chair Jaime Harrison downplayed a question about New York’s crime rate, saying “it’s guaranteed” the city will be safer by 2024, given Adams’ and Hochul’s commitment to the issue.

“All of these cities that we are visiting right now, I feel very confident that our visitors will be safe,” Harrison said. “That’s not a worry for us because we know these are going to be some of the most secure events around the country.”

Adams and his economic development team are showing the DNC officials around the city Thursday and Friday — a tour that includes stops at nearby hotels, the Museum of Modern Art, restaurants in the newly opened Hudson Yards complex on Manhattan’s West Side and potentially the Shubert Theatre for “POTUS on Broadway.” They are also viewing Javits and Madison Square Garden, which would co-host the convention.

The DNC is expected to announce its decision sometime this fall.

“This is a comeback, and by 2024, we’ll be hitting on all strides, and people will want to come here to celebrate the rebirth of our country after Covid — the long, dark slumber of Covid — but also the rebirth of our Democratic Party,” Hochul said.

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